Tag Archives: Worker’s Compensation

Best Practices For Managing Workers’ Comp Claims Audio Conference

Attend an audio conference on Best Practices for Managing Workers’ Comp Claims

Are you an employer or someone who manages Workers’ Compensation claims for your company?  If not, but you know someone who fits this criteria, please share this post with them as the following information will be beneficial to them.

ABTrainingCenter.com is offering a 90-minute audio conference where their expert, Randy DeVaul, reviews successful strategies for tracking, monitoring, and managing your company’s workers’ comp claims.
The Reno Agency thinks this is a valuable training experience for our commercial clients and to those who work in handling workers’ comp claims, so we want to share the information with you.

ABTrainingCtr

Description:

Date: Thursday, January 22, 2015
Time: 1:00 – 2:30pm EST
Format: Audio Conference
When an employee is injured at work, workers’ compensation benefits are available to cover lost wages and medical costs related to the injury. Whether those benefits spiral out of control or are properly managed depends on you – the workers’ compensation administrator.
Therefore, this audio conference will review details on what needs managing, what relationships you need to develop, and what you need to do when a “high-risk” injury occurs.
You and/or your co-workers will also learn:
  • When injuries are and are not compensable under workers’ compensation
  • Why you never deny a claim and what you need to do if the claim is not compensable
  • Why you need a relationship with your workers’ comp carrier
  • The types of injuries that are “high-risk” – and why you need to be focused on them
  • What policies I need to have in place to support the program

 

About Your Presenter:

Randy DeVaul, Sc.D., M.A., is a 30+ year safety professional with more than 20 years working directly in and with workers’ compensation programs. DeVaul has successfully helped employers reduce workers’ compensation costs with his practical, real-world experience.


 

More Details/ Order:

Go to http://www.ABTrainingCenter.com/showWCDetails.asp?TCID=1014797

Or,

Call ABTrainingCenter at 770-410-9375


 

 

Tips to Defeat the Heat

 

 

Thankfully in Michigan, we don’t often see triple digit temperatures in the summer time. However, that doesn’t mean it doesn’t get hot. And let’s not start on the humidity.

Our friends at Hastings Mutual Insurance Company have some real life stories about heat stress incidents they want to share with you, and helpful tips on how to beat the heat.

Roofers on a roofIn the construction industry, an employee began installing a roof on a hot sunny morning. Two hours later, he complained of feeling ill and vomited. However, he continued working. At 3:00 pm, when he descended the ladder, he was disoriented and confused. He missed a step and fell to the ground. His supervisor and some of his co-workers drove him to the hospital and several hours later was pronounced dead. His internal body core temperature was approximately 108 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

Man carrying basket of grapes in vineyardIn the agricultural industry, a young worker arrived for her shift at a vineyard. Her job required her to spend long hours tying grapevines in the sun. As the day wore on, the temperature skyrocketed, eventually reaching well into the triple digits. After nine hours of work, she collapsed from heat exhaustion. Two days later, she succumbed to the effects of the heat exhaustion and died. She was only 17 years old and her life was snuffled out due to overexposure to the heat.

 

Hastings Mutual Insurance Company wants you to know that the two above examples were totally preventable.

Here are three simple steps to defeat the heat:

1. Water

Drink plenty of fluids throughout the day. This is no mystery since our bodies are almost entirely composed of water. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink water. By that point, you are already on your way to becoming dehydrated. A general rule of thumb is to drink 4 cups of water every hour. It is most effective to drink a small amount of water every 15 minutes.

2. Rest

Rest breaks help the body to recover.

3. Shade

Resting in the shade or air-conditioning helps the body to cool down.

 

More steps to reduce the risk of heat exhaustion:

1. Report symptoms of heat illness right away

2. Wear light-colored cotton clothing

3. Wear a hat

4. Wear sunscreen to prevent sunburn

5. Watch out for persons who show signs of heat stress

6. Know where you are working in case you need to call 9-1-1

 

While waiting for medical assistance, you can help a person in distress by:

1. Moving the person to a cool, shady area

2. Loosen the person’s clothing

3. Fan air on the worker

4. Apply cool water or ice packs to his or her skin

 

Heat-Related Illness: Know the Signs

It’s important to know the signs of heat-related illness – acting quickly can save lives.

– Heat Stroke: It’s the most serious heat-related illness. Usually, when your body builds up heat, you sweat to get rid of the extra heat. With heat stroke, your body can’t cool down.

The symptoms include: confusion, fainting, seizures, very high body temperature, and hot, dry skin or profuse sweating.

Heat stroke is a medical emergency. Call 9-1-1 if a person shows any signs of heat stroke.

– Heat exhaustion: Happens when your body loses too much water and salt through sweating.

The symptoms may include: headache, nausea, dizziness, weakness, thirst and heavy sweating.

– Heat fatigue, heat cramps, and heat rash: These are less serious, but they are still signs of over exposure to heat.

 

OSHA Heat PosterAs a business owner, you can prevent or reduce the chance of your employees falling into these situations by:

– Providing ample cold water for all employees in convenient, visible locations close to the work area.

– Encourage workers to drink water before they get thirsty, or about every 15 minutes.

– Offering plenty of breaks in a shady area or in an air-conditioning facility.

– Encourage employees to wear, or provide employees with light-colored and permeable clothing.

– Monitor workers for signs and symptoms of heat exposure and encourage employees to report symptoms of any heat-related illnesses.

– Train workers and supervisors about the hazards leading to heat stress and ways to prevent them.

– Implement an emergency plan and know what to do if someone is experiencing symptoms of a heat-related illness.

– Monitor weather conditions and reschedule jobs with high heat exposure to cooler times of the day.

 

 

Do You Know the Difference Between Physical and Occupational Therapy for a Worker’s Comp Claim?

InjuryIf you are injured on the job and need to undergo therapy, most people would assume that it’s occupational therapy they need because the accident happened on the job. That is not always the case.

I have provided a link to an article titled, “Differences Between Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy,” that describes the differences between physical and occupational therapy as it relates to worker’s compensation claims.

The following article was written by Rebecca Shafer, JD, President of Amaxx Risk Solutions, Inc., and is a national expert in the field of worker’s compensation.

http://blog.reduceyourworkerscomp.com/2013/01/differences-between-physical-therapy-and-occupational-therapy/#axzz2Ip3dvvvO